Optimizing cost savings in EPDM extrusion compounds

EPDM has not been immune to significant price increases, material shortages and allocations. As extrusion expenses are dominated by material cost and throughput, price and efficiency are of the essence. One of the most common ways to improve cost efficiencies in extrusion compounds is to lower material cost by extending the polymer as much as possible using high amounts of filler, for which EPDM is perfectly suited. The other option to decrease costs is to run more product in the same amount of time, requiring a material with higher extrusion rates.

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Evaluation of resilient graphitic carbon in a lip seal formulation

The potential of Superior Graphite (RGC39A graphite) in a model lip seal formulation was evaluated for abrasion resistance for a wide range of loads. The abrasion testing was based on the ASTM D3702 test method for wear rate and coefficient of friction (COF) of materials in self-lubricated rubbing contact using a thrust washer testing machine. The role of graphite type on key properties was determined. The evaluations included tensile properties, hardness, Phillips dispersion, abrasion resistance and coefficient of friction. The abrasion and COF test varied the counter surface conditions (dry, wet and oily) and the load (pressure) from 30 to 625 psi.

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CPE: A unique polymer for rubber and plastics extrusion

Chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) polymers were developed by DuPont in the late 1950s by a simple chlorination of polyethylene (PE) in a solution process using a solvent. In 1971, Dow Chemical Company introduced Tyrin CPE using a more efficient and cost-effective aqueous suspension chlorination known as the slurry process. The polyethylene feedstock is in a powder form and the final CPE product remains in powder form. The chlorination process can be modified to produce amorphous (non-crystalline) products or products that contain residual crystallinity

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CO2-switchable materials for the rubber industry

Recent developments in stimuli-responsive or “smart” materials offer the opportunity for major advances in material design that could impact markets for latexes. One of the lesser known, but simpler technologies includes polymers and latexes whose properties can be dramatically, and reversibly, switched simply by adding or removing CO2. The processes used offer advantages in sustainability without requiring expensive materials or catalysts, and are based on currently used materials and production methods. This article will give a general overview of three examples relevant to latexes and coatings

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